Tag Archives: cancer research

From Mini-Guts to Mini-Brains: Organoids and Their Uses

I’ve written before about why I work with animals in my cancer research, and why mice can be very useful in biology research, but I want to talk today about advancements in alternatives to animal experiments. A┬ácommon question in science

An Atypical Day in the Life of This Scientist

Diary of a Scientist // 4 January 2017 I’m typically awake before my alarm goes off at 6:30, my mind already racing through the things I need to do for the day. My Google calendar looks like a confetti explosion

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 5: Is This Thing On?

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

In the Headlines: Gene Editing in Humans

// I’m hard at work on a special double-feature for science news next week, but in the meantime I want to highlight some big news published in Nature this week. CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 4: There is No Google Translate for Science

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 3: Resistance is Not Futile

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

Does Organ Function Determine Cancer Susceptibility?

Research article // Evolutionary Ecology of Organs: A Missing Link in Cancer Development? Some background // In the past few weeks I’ve focused a bit on why treating cancer is difficult (check out part 1 and part 2 to read┬ámore).

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 1: Your Tumor is Not a Clone

There are many reasons that cancer is difficult to treat. This article discusses one of those reasons: heterogeneity in tumors.

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