Tag Archives: cancer research

Beware of Scientific “Claims” in the Media

Sir David Spiegelhalter knows a thing or two about statistics. At the University of Cambridge, one of his areas of study is how the concept of risk and statistical evidence are discussed in society, and he is also the current president

Part 1, The Sequel: Attack of the Clones

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

From Mini-Guts to Mini-Brains: Organoids and Their Uses

I’ve written before about why I work with animals in my cancer research, and why mice can be very useful in biology research, but I want to talk today about advancements in alternatives to animal experiments. A common question in science

An Atypical Day in the Life of This Scientist

Diary of a Scientist // 4 January 2017 I’m typically awake before my alarm goes off at 6:30, my mind already racing through the things I need to do for the day. My Google calendar looks like a confetti explosion

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 5: Is This Thing On?

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

In the Headlines: Gene Editing in Humans

// I’m hard at work on a special double-feature for science news next week, but in the meantime I want to highlight some big news published in Nature this week. CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 4: There is No Google Translate for Science

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 3: Resistance is Not Futile

Cancer as a “disease” is incredibly complex, and patient care for a cancer diagnosis is complex as a result. I’m starting to explore some of these difficulties in a series of articles: “Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult.” Previously published

Does Organ Function Determine Cancer Susceptibility?

Research article // Evolutionary Ecology of Organs: A Missing Link in Cancer Development? Some background // In the past few weeks I’ve focused a bit on why treating cancer is difficult (check out part 1 and part 2 to read more).

Why Treating Cancer is So Difficult, Part 1: Your Tumor is Not a Clone

There are many reasons that cancer is difficult to treat. This article discusses one of those reasons: heterogeneity in tumors.

RSS
Instagram
SOCIALICON
SOCIALICON